Links and Info for Financial Aid for Pets

Please read all the way to the bottom as there are many many organizations that provide assistance for pets.


 Financial Resources for Cat Care -  by Alley Cat Allies
http://www.alleycat.org/economy

Financial Resources for Cat Care
Are you facing tough financial times and struggling to make ends meet for your entire family—including your pets and feral cat colony? Alley Cat Allies has ideas on how to make providing care more affordable, including resources for obtaining food and for helping you cover emergency veterinary costs.


Feral Cat Colony Financial Help
If you are caring for a feral cat colony, there are multiple avenues to find support to help you obtain affordable or free food and shelter for the cats.

Resources for Obtaining Cat Food

Check for surplus food at your local humane society, or human food bank, or local food pantries. Feeding America has an online food bank locator at www.feedingamerica.org.
Ask your local market or pet supply store to donate broken packages or dented cans. Some retailers will also donate out-of-date products, which are still good for a few months longer than the sell-by date.
Ask local vet clinics if they have surplus or just-out-of-date premium pet foods that they are willing to donate.
Hold a cat food drive. Announce the drive in the local paper to collect donations from the public. Your workplace, local religious institutions, and civic or youth groups may be willing to help as well. Sometimes youth groups, clubs, and high schools require community projects that benefit both people and animals. Work with your local scout troop or volunteer organization on the drive for feral cat caregivers. Ask local markets and pet supply shops if you may put out an attractive bin requesting cat food donations.
Resources for Obtaining Shelters/Cat Houses for Feral Cats

Ask for scrap lumber from building supply stores or contractors, often available at little or no cost.
Place an ad asking for used dog houses. This could net several free shelters that, with minor improvements, can be made suitable for cats (usually insulation needs to be added and the door made smaller).
Host a shelter building party. Get together with other caregivers and/or your local feral cat organization’s supporters to build the houses together. Contact a local Boy or Girl Scout or other youth organization and ask interested youth to complete a service project to help build shelters.
Alley Cat Allies’ website shows several inexpensive shelters you can make yourself, available at www.alleycat.org/BuildAShelter (click on the second bullet).
Spay/Neuter Help

Alley Cat Allies’ Feral Friends Network is a group of organizations or individuals with feral cat expertise and veterinary practices and clinics that provide neuter surgeries for feral cats located in communities nationwide. Go to www.alleycat.org/response to locate a Feral Friend near you who may offer low-cost or subsidized spay/neuter surgery for feral cats.
Veterinary Care
Emergency veterinary care can be costly. These national organizations provide funds to those in need.

AAHA Helping Pets Fund (www.aahahelpingpets.org) - This fund helps those in need access quality veterinary care for sick or injured pets. Grants temporarily suspended but will begin again in July 2009.
Angels4Animals (www.angels4animals.org) - Friends or veterinarians use the “contact us” page to refer an animal family in need of financial assistance.
CareCredit (www.carecredit.com) - Offers a revolving line of credit for veterinary expenses.
Cats in Crisis (www.catsincrisis.org) - Helps individuals and humane organizations care for cats with chronic or emergency medical conditions through financial and fundraising assistance. Grants temporarily suspended, but check often for re-up date.
Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance Program (www.fveap.org/sys-tmpl/door/) – This program provides financial assistance to cat and kitten guardians who are unable to afford veterinary services to save their companions when life-threatening illness or injury strikes.
Help-A-Pet (www.help-a-pet.org) - Help-A-Pet provides financial assistance nationwide for the medical care of pets whose owners are unable to afford the expense; for individuals with income below $20,000 or a family income below $40,000.
IMOM (www.imom.org) - Financial assistance for life-threatening and emergency veterinary care. IMOM is dedicated to ensuring that no companion animal has to be euthanized simply because their caretaker is financially challenged.
The Pet Fund (www.thepetfund.com) - Provides financial assistance to owners of domestic animals who need urgent veterinary care.
United Animal Nations (www.uan.org/lifeline/index.html) – LifeLine grants help Good Samaritans, animal rescuers and low-income families with the high cost of caring for pets by providing grants to meet emergency veterinary expenses they otherwise couldn’t afford.
Location-Specific Veterinary Care
Many local shelters, humane societies, clinics, and pet organizations have special emergency funds to use for families who need special assistance within their communities. Here are a handful, some of which also provide additional help for ongoing animal care:

Atlanta - Pets Are Loving Support (www.palsatlanta.org/) - P.A.L.S. provides pet-care, including free food and basic veterinary care, and support to the companion pets of critically ill and disabled Atlantans.
Central Ohio - Pet Promise (www.petpromise.org/programs.html) - Provides financial assistance to low-income pet owners who can’t afford medical care for their pets. Also sponsors Operation Fill-A-Bowl, providing free of charge, cat and dog food to pet owners who need assistance and to the caretakers of feral cat populations. Their City Kitty program provides vaccinations and spay/neuter surgeries for feral cats.
Connecticut Humane Society (www.cthumane.org) - The Connecticut Humane Society’s Fox Memorial Clinic is a full-service veterinary practice that provides veterinary care for animals whose owners are in financial need.
New York - NY Save (www.nysave.org) - Aid and assistance for low-income pet owners residing in one of the five boroughs of New York City, whose pet is in need of emergency veterinary care.
Northern Nevada/Lake Tahoe - Shakespeare Animal Fund (www.shakespeareanimalfund.org) - People in the Northern Nevada/Lake Tahoe area can apply for funds, with an emphasis on those on fixed incomes or with annual incomes below $35,000.
Salt Lake City - Pet Samaritan Fund (www.petsamaritan.org) - Provides financial assistance to Utah pet owners who cannot afford medical care for their pets due to extreme financial hardship (up to $100 upon receipt of veterinary billing statement).
San Francisco - Pets Are Wonderful Support (www.pawssf.org) - Provides for the comprehensive needs of companion animals for low-income persons with HIV/AIDS and other disabling illnesses, as well as senior citizens in the San Francisco area.
Washington, DC – Pets DC (www.petsdc.org) - Dedicated to improving the health and well being of people living with HIV/AIDS or other disabling conditions and their companion pets by providing public health education, exercise, pet food, veterinary care, grooming, foster care, and adoptions services at no cost to individuals in the Metropolitan Washington area.
Other Ideas for Getting Help
Work with your veterinarian. Some veterinarians may be willing to work out a payment plan with you, especially if you can provide some of the payment up front.
Contact friends and family and fundraise. It’s not easy asking for help. But when your animal’s life hangs in the balance, it may be the best option to borrow money or hold a fundraiser.
Plan ahead. Cut costs and start a savings plan. Consider getting pet owner’s insurance to cover veterinary costs now to prepare for any tough times you may have ahead.
Get in touch with breed-specific groups. If your pet is a specific breed, the groups associated with it often have funds available to help provide the care your animal needs.
Facing Foreclosure?
The news is full of stories of animals losing their homes along with their pet parents due to home foreclosure. Some tips for dealing with this looming threat:

Educate yourself about ways to prevent foreclosure all together. The best way to keep your whole family together (pets and all) is to stay in your home. At http://makinghomeaffordable.gov/, you can see if you are eligible for government-sponsored foreclosure alternatives, such as refinancing or loan modifications.
No Paws Left Behind (http://nopawsleftbehind.org/paws/) is a nonprofit that provides tips for homeowners as well as an online network to get your pet into the safest place possible if needed.
Search for pet-friendly housing. Almost every local humane society or rescue group keeps a list of pet-friendly housing in the area. Some also offer mediation services to help you convince a potential landlord to allow the animal to come with you if it is not normally acceptable. To prepare for these discussions, gather proof of your responsibility toward your pet, including veterinary care and statements from others agreeing to your conscientiousness.
Work hard to find your animal the best temporary home possible. Talk with family, friends, co-workers, and neighbors. Ask your veterinarian about temporary boarding. Whatever you do, do not take your animal to an open-admission shelter, because they will likely be killed.


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Pet Health Care -- What To Do When You Can't Afford Vet Care - from www.dancingdogblog.com
http://www.dancingdogblog.com/2013/04/pet-health-care-what-to-do-when-you-cant-afford-vet-care/?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter



Pet Health Care — What To Do When You Can’t Afford Vet Care
by MARY HAIGHT on APRIL 3, 2013
Pet health care is one thing pet parents want to get right.  We know it’s our job to see to it that health needs are met, yet with the advent of more and more human technologies being applied to dog and cat diseases, the cost of treatment can easily outpace ability to pay. I first posted links to sources for help with vet bills in 2009. Things have changed, money ran out for some, but other organizations have come to the forefront.

If you did not have the foresight to buy insurance when you first brought your pet home — and according to reports, many of us can’t afford health insurance for ourselves let alone our pets — when a disease like cancer or an accident occurs that requires expensive surgery, costs can become an impossible financial obstacle to overcome. Where do you turn for help when vets will not structure a payment plan you can reliably meet, and you have no alternatives to help your pet get treatment?

1. AAHA – AAHA Helping Pets Fund works with affiliated veterinary practices to help owners facing financial hardship.  If your vet is at one of their approved hospitals, s/he can recommend you to their program, and you may receive assistance from their emergency and non-elective fund programs if you qualify.

2. Red Rover – Relief Grants available to veterinarians to fund urgent, life-saving vet care nationwide. The typical grant is very small – $100 to $200 dollars per case. However, they also offer fundraising ideas and advice, and have also compiled a listing of other services.

3. Brown Dog Foundation — Founded to” bridge the gap between the cost of  medical care and saving the family pet”, BDF offers grants to veterinarians usually in excess of $1,000. There are many applications, and while many grants go to in-State cases (TN), they collect funds nationally and do make some outside grants to a limited number of States.

4. IMOM –  Formed “to insure that no companion animal has to be euthanized simply because their caretaker is financially challenged.” Working off donations, IMOM has paid out nearly $1.5 million since they opened in 1998 through 2010. They are temporarily closed but expect to open again April 15.

5. Buddy Care Foundation — Grants to help cover the costs of life-saving medical care. The owner must be able to pay 25% of the costs at minimum and it is advised they apply to Care Credit. There are many other qualifications to meet, as the others listed here also require.

6. Care Credit — Readily available and easiest to obtain of all the financing options for CCL repair surgery. They offer a full range of payment plans with low/no interest for a set period, which depends on the agreement CareCredit has with your veterinarian’s office.

7. Pet Fund — Grants to “help companion animal owners avoid the difficult decision to put an animal down or neglect medical needs because of the costs involved.” They do not fund emergencies.

8. PetChance — Relatively new to the scene, PetChance.org is not designed for emergency medical needs, but is a crowd-funding site like Kickstarter, exclusively for pets. You register, create a “chance” for your pet with the details of what is needed, spread the news on your social media sites (they have a blog post to give you guidance) so they and others can come and donate. Money collected is paid to the veterinarian.

 I spoke with PetChance.org’s Peter Alberti about the problem of getting people to ask for help: “People want to help – it can be daunting to ask anyone for help. Be it friends and family or people you’ve never met, you sometimes have to wonder, ‘why would anyone give me money for my pet?’  The truth is, people donate to causes all day long – because they feel good about it!  So you need to give them the opportunity to do this for you, and make sure they hear/learn about it so they can seize the opportunity.  It may sound strange, but giving people the opportunity to be helpful is actually unselfish.”

What I noticed on most of these sites was that you must get involved with raising funds in some way, whether it’s online or getting a second job – to make sure your bill gets paid in full. Some require that you contribute a percentage of costs.

Be sure to check out these links – they often lead to still more links that will give you ideas on how to raise more pet health care funding, and also information about breed grants available, grants limited to a particular State, for senior dogs, even for specific illnesses. Good luck in your search!
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FundAPetMiracle


MaddiesInstitute  Many links on this site


Paws4ACure

Other resources on P4AC site

3 comments:

  1. What an amazing article to find. Everything in God's perfect timing. praying I can find assistance for my baby. thank you. Not ready to come out of the I need help closet... God bless..

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